Home / National News / Federal Court Set to Hear Appeal on Kansas Voter ID Law

 

(NEW YORK) — A federal appeals court is set to hear arguments regarding an effort by the state of Kansas to reinstate rules that require its residents to present proof of U.S. citizenship at the Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) when registering to vote.

The hearing, which will take place in Denver, Colorado, comes as a series of proposed voter ID laws are being considered or contested across the country prior to the presidential election in November. The Kansas law notably left thousands of residents who believed they had registered to vote while obtaining driver’s licenses ineligible to do so, angering civil rights groups.

The controversial law was struck down earlier this year by a U.S. District Court judge in Kansas City.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), who sued the state in July, argued that the Kansas law is in conflict with the National Voter Registration Act, a federal law that was enacted to “enhance voting opportunities for every American,” according to the Department of Justice.

In North Carolina last month, federal judges overturned state voter ID laws, ruling that they were formed with “discriminatory intent” toward black voters. State officials then asked the U.S. Supreme Court to maintain the voter identification requirement and 10 days of early voting for the November election.

In Texas this month, a judge agreed to a proposal that will allow citizens without sufficient photo ID to still vote with a regular ballot.

A U.S. appeals court suspended a July 19 ruling by a federal judge that struck down parts of Wisconsin’s voter ID law.

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