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(DETROIT) — Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette has announced charges against three officials in connection with the Flint water crisis.

Two Michigan Department of Environmental Quality employees and one Flint Water Plant employee face various felony and misdemeanor charges, court documents show.

MDEQ employee Michael Prysby was charged with two felony counts of misconduct in office, two felony counts of tampering with evidence and two misdemeanor counts of violation of the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act.

Fellow MDEQ employee Stephen Busch is facing one felony count of misconduct in office, two felony counts of tampering with evidence and two misdemeanor counts of violation of the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act.

Flint Water Plant Water Quality Supervisor Michael Glasglow is charged with felony tampering with evidence and misdemeanor willful neglect of duty.

In a press conference Wednesday, Schuette accused Prysby and Busch of endangering the health of Flint residents by altering test results to show lower levels of lead in the city’s water.

Schuette also said the two MDEQ employees “misled federal and local authorities, regulatory officials, and failed to provide safe and clean water to families of Flint.”

Prysby’s additional misconduct charge stems from his alleged authorizing of a permit for the Flint water treatment plant, which Schuette said he knew would fail to provide safe, clean water.

“There’s so many things that went terribly wrong and tragically wrong in Flint,” Schuette said.

The two MDEQ employees violated the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act by failing to add anti-corrosive agents to the drinking water, Schuette alleged. He added that they allegedly manipulated water samples by directly asking Flint citizens to pre-flush their taps.

“They had a duty to protect the health of families of citizens of Flint,” Schuette said. “They failed to discharge their duties…. Indeed, they failed us all.”

Glasgow, a city employee, allegedly tampered with evidence by altering and falsifying reports to the MDEQ and Environmental Protection Agency, Schuette said. His willful neglect charge stems from alleged his violation of the Michigan Safe Drinking Water Act.

Schuette said the state is conducting a “thorough, complete and exhaustive” investigation and that every person who broke the law in the water crisis will be held accountable.

The maximum sentences for each of the felonies range from four to five years in prison, with fines for each in a range between $5,000-$10,000, according to the attorney general’s office.

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