Home / National News / DOJ to Announce No Charges in Trayvon Martin's Death


(WASHINGTON) — While the public waits for a Justice Department announcement over two separate investigations spurred by the summer shooting of an unarmed teenager in Ferguson, Missouri, the DOJ will first announce its findings in the killing of Trayvon Martin.

ABC News has learned Martin’s family will soon be notified that the Justice Department will not be filing charges against George Zimmerman, who shot the 17-year-old after a confrontation in 2012. Thursday marks three years to the day since Martin was killed.

Federal prosecutors concluded there isn’t sufficient evidence to prove Zimmerman, a neighborhood watchman in Sanford, Florida, intentionally violated Martin’s civil rights, sources told ABC News.

The case sparked intense discussions over race in America.  Martin was walking to his home with only Skittles and an iced tea in his hands when Zimmerman confronted him.

Florida prosecutors tried to convict Zimmerman of state-level murder and manslaughter charges, but in July 2013, a jury acquitted him, saying prosecutors didn’t have enough evidence to prove their case.

One juror -– the only minority on the all-female jury –- later told ABC News that “as the law was read to me, if you have no proof that he killed him intentionally, you can’t say he’s guilty.”

“You can’t put the man in jail even though in our hearts we felt he was guilty,” she said. “But we had to grab our hearts and put it aside and look at the evidence.”

In Sanford, race-related tensions had been simmering for nearly a century, but Martin’s death “was the proverbial ‘straw that broke the camel’s back,’” bringing “those issues to the surface,” the new Sanford police chief, Cecil Smith, recently told federal officials.

After Martin was killed, Attorney General Eric Holder sat down his own teenage son to explain that — as unfair as it may be — young black men must often interact with police in a different way than others, he told an NAACP convention in July 2013. It was “a father-son tradition I hoped would not need to be handed down,” Holder added.

As media attention mounted over Martin’s death, protests grew across the country calling for justice. The city of Sanford now says a police department had not been scrutinized like that by the press, religious organizations, social activists and the broader public since Los Angeles police beat Rodney King in 1991.

Zimmerman was not a police officer, and the neighborhood watch program of which he was a part was independent from local police.

Many accused Zimmerman of discriminating against Martin — essentially taking action against the teenager and ultimately killing him because Martin was black. Zimmerman is Hispanic.

The Justice Department’s Civil Rights Division and FBI opened an investigation into the case, noting “experienced federal prosecutors” would determine “whether the evidence reveals a prosecutable violation” of federal law. In a statement, the department noted there are “limited federal criminal civil rights statutes within our jurisdiction.”

Privately and publicly, Justice Department officials have been telegraphing all along that they were unlikely to file charges against Zimmerman. In November 2013, Holder said the case against Zimmerman “in substantial part was resolved” with his acquittal months earlier.

Nevertheless, federal officials have insisted their civil rights probe would be thorough and complete. Several months ago — nearly two years into the Justice Department’s investigation — Holder said federal investigators were still seeking to interview certain witnesses “as a result of some recent developments.”

More recently, Holder has said he hoped to announce the findings of the Zimmerman and Ferguson-related probes before he leaves office, which could happen in a matter of weeks, depending on when the U.S. Senate confirms his successor.

Holder has said when a decision is announced in the Zimmerman case, it will be accompanied by “as much information” as possible detailing the Justice Department’s findings.

In the Ferguson case, the department is currently conducting two probes.

A criminal investigation will try to determine whether then-officer Darren Wilson used unreasonable force and intentionally violated Michael Brown’s civil rights when he shot the unarmed teenager in August. The second probe — though not criminal in nature — will look more broadly into whether the Ferguson police department has routinely engaged in a “pattern or practice” of unlawful and discriminatory policing.

A state grand jury in Ferguson declined to indict Wilson in November 2014. Many expect the Justice Department will not be able to bring federal charges against Wilson, but will take action against the police department.

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